Login  |  Search

DK Blog

Admin - Tue Sep 25, 2012 @ 08:39AM
Comments: 7

There is a right way and a wrong way to clean your HDMI TV. The right way is to use a microfiber cloth, and to only dampen it very little for the toughest blotches. And never rub hard. To do anything else might damage your HDMI screen and reduce the quality of the image. It seems the thing is covered with glass or plastic and is hermetically sealed. Why not just Windex it and wipe? But this is the wrong way to do it. You are dealing with a delicate piece of HDMI equipment, not the windows in your home!

Also be sure to turn your HDMI television off before you even touch it with microfiber, especially if it is damp. Never use cloth, paper towels, tissues, or your bare hands. To do so risks scratching the HDMI screen's protective surface or getting grease or grime on it which can lead to corrosion of the laminate surface. 

Comments: 7
Admin - Sun Jul 08, 2012 @ 07:33PM
Comments: 6

I don't get it. Mitt Romney claims he wasn't involved in Bain Capital's massive investment in Stericycle, a medical waste company that disposes of test animal and abortion remains. But when I looked online with the Securities and Exchange Commission and searched for Stericylce's 13D, I found evidence to the contrary. Mitt Romney's name is all over this beneficial interest disclosure! Maybe he isn't denying that he signed off on it, but that because he wasn't actively involved at that time he just signed on the dotted line when his admin assistant brought him the documents for execution?

This doesn't sit well with me. 

Why? Because if some guy is running for President, we want him to be conscious of his actions. We don't want a President that just signs off on this and that without reading what he's signing, do we? If Romney is being honest about his minimal involvement in the Stericycle investment, then his only excuse for signing the 13D is that he wasn't paying attention to what he was doing. Not paying attention when millions of dollars are at stake? That's crazy! Who wants someone so careless running this country?

Comments: 6
Admin - Tue Jul 03, 2012 @ 01:00AM
Comments: 6

When a person needs a lawyer, what do they do? Usually they go in and have an initial interview with a lawyer they just found or seek one a friend recommended. Maybe they had a car wreck, so they opened up the Yellow Pages and picked the lawyer with the biggest, color ad, you know one with a special insert for color photographs instead of just black and yellow. Or maybe they wanted a divorce, so they just called one of their friends they knew had just untied the knot. Sometimes they get a free initial interview with a lawyer, but that's it. Next thing you know, they are putting $5000 into that lawyer's retainer. They don't ask any questions. They just assume their hard earned money is going into good hands, will be safe, and the desired results will be achieved. Think again!

Never, never, ever, give a lawyer any money up front unless you at least get his credit report first. You have to ask him for it, and if he's not willing to give it to you in return for proving he can be trusted with your $5000, find another lawyer. A good lawyer with nothing to hide should give you his credit report! Why shouldn't he? He is a person in business, and he is a vendor of services to you. Vendors prove their credit worthiness ahead of time. Before they hold any money in trust or get it up front. It is a common business practice. Usually though, when you investigate a business you run a Dun and Bradstreet report to see if they are a credit risk. But with a solo practitioner lawyer, get his credit report. Ask him for it. You can't pull it yourself. You could get into legal trouble. If he won't cough it up, he is probably hiding something.

References: How do I Find a Lawyer?

Comments: 6
Admin - Thu Jun 21, 2012 @ 02:41PM
Comments: 9

I discovered this cool blog post about how to make money online using sweepstakes recently. While there are all sorts of get rich quick blogs out there, this post intrigued me because it was simple and efficient. It was more focused on how to supplement your income than getting rich.

That works just fine for me. This is something anyone could do and earn a little extra cash. You might not become a millionaire overnight, but you can create a strategy for earning a little extra money by entering a few online sweepstakes.

Believe it or not, most of these are easy to win. The stuff you win may not be super extraordinary or vast piles of cash, but they are things you can resell for some extra money or donate for tax breaks. Check out the Nifty Nack blog for more details.

Comments: 9
Admin - Tue Jun 05, 2012 @ 09:29PM
Comments: 5

Have you ever been in a situation where no one really cared what you had to say? Exactly. We have too. As a matter of fact, whenever you are in a dispute, this adage is even more pertinent. Say you've done something wrong in a business situation. Like messed up on a job for a customer. Does your customer ever care to hear why you messed up? The answer is clearly no. He wants you to sit there and listen to how he has been wronged and how your big mess up has made his life more difficult.

This is why we liked the blog we recently read on Negotiation Tip # 4 Make it Their Story. The whole concept is that when you are in a negotiation, especially if you've messed up, you really have to make it about the person you've wronged. They don't want to listen to you! You have two ears and one mouth for a reason, so be Silent, Listen, and adhere to Negotiation Tip # 4. Make it their Story! There is nothing like being listened to when you are mad, and there is nothing better than hearing the whole story from the mouth of the person you've wronged. Listen closely, and you might discover exactly what you need to do to fix the problem!

Comments: 5
Comments: 6

If you are an employer, providing your employees with workers' compensation coverage, or insurance can be a good policy. "What is workers' compensation?" you might ask. It is essentially an insurance policy you carry on your employees in case they are injured, disabled, or get sick on the job. Another name for it, by the way, is workmans' compensation. In fact, depending on your jurisdiction, you may be legally required to provide workers' compensation, but it varies from place to place. One state or country may not have any law on the matter, whereas others might actually provide the coverage entirely via its tax base. Some jurisdictions simply regulate workers' compensation coverage, or may even maintain high risk insurance pools for companies that can't get coverage. In some cases, companies can self fund coverage, skipping the need for an insurance carrier entirely. Self funding is either a choice, or if regulated, a company can often self fund after satisfying its Labor Department it has sufficient assets to do so.

In any event, the big advantage to providing workers' compensation coverage is the minimization of risk. In most jurisdictions, and employer providing its workers coverage cannot be sued for work related injuries, disability, or illness should it have a qualifying plan in place and the affected worker accepts coverage. So, by paying a regular premium, the employer can avoid a lot of litigation, as well as the risk of having a big judgment handed down against him. By providing and accepting coverage, both the employer and employee are basically agreeing to stay out of court in return for each holding the other harmless. The employee is provided for until he can return to work and cannot be fired for having been either the cause of the subject event or missing mandatory days of work.

Comments: 6
Admin - Thu Apr 26, 2012 @ 02:21PM
Comments: 4

If you are a small Internet/web company of only 5 people and you don't even have a physical location, if you receive a wage garnishment Notice, you have to answer it. You can't just say "what is wage garnishment to me?" and throw it in the trash. Or, "We don't do garnishments." Granted, you may have grounds for arguing against it, like lack of jurisdiction, or that you no longer employ whomever the garnishment is after, but you still have to file a timely answer. In the answer you can state whatever arguments you might have. That is your right. Additionally, you can't fire your employees just because they have gotten into this trouble and caused you the hardship of filling out extra paperwork and possibly bearing the cost of paying your payroll provider an extra fee for cutting two checks instead of one each pay period. The Consumer Credit Protection Act protects your employees from you firing them for being garnished, at least for the first judgment they get against them. So, don't fire an employee for being garnished unless you want to risk being sued for their lost wages and a bunch of other things beyond the scope of this article.

Speaking of damages and trouble, if you fail to answer a garnishment letter, you can be on the hook for anything you should have paid out according to the garnishment, plus costs and attorney's fees. It doesn't matter if you end up paying the same wages twice. So answer any garnishment notices you get, else you might be found in contempt of court. So remember, saying "What is a wage garnishment anyway?" Or, "We don't answer them," is not an appropriate answer. Every employer must respond appropriately as a matter of law, even if you are a small technology company with only 5 employees and you have no physical location. Perhaps you do have a defense, but put it in your answer. You already have enough problems with too much paperwork!

Comments: 4
Admin - Mon Apr 16, 2012 @ 07:29AM
Comments: 9

Cable television is not cheap for most of us. $100 to $200 per month adds up. $200 per month for cable service costs $2400 per year, and that is not a small chunk of change. The good news is that you can reduce this cost by as much as 90% by cancelling your cable subscription and signing up for Netflix, Hulu, or both. Netflix and Hulu are both around $10 per month. All you need you probably have, but for perhaps the correct cable for hooking your laptop and HDMI TV together. And you can get an HDMI cable cheap at your local electronics store. 

Here is what you do:

1. Check your laptop and your television to see if there is an HDMI output on your laptop and an HDMI input on your TV. If yes, go to step 2 below. If no, consider upgrading.

2. Check around the house to see if you have an HDMI to TV cable to connect your television and laptop. If yes, go to step 3 below. If no, note your laptop and TV make and model, call your local electronics store and ask them if they have the cable you need in stock. If so, go get it.

3. Hook your laptop and TV together and sign up for Hulu, Netflix, or both. If you get the clarity and connection and streaming you desire, go to step 4.

4. Cancel your cable subscription and start saving!

Comments: 9
Admin - Thu Apr 05, 2012 @ 06:58PM
Comments: 8

If your company is behind in the A/R department, bad things can happen. Cash starts getting tight, your bank starts asking questions, meeting payroll is tenuous at times, and when you have to place a large down payment on a materials purchase, you are scraping the bottom of the barrel. Heck, revenue looks good. But, revenue is only as good as the cash that comes in. You can have all the revenue in the world, but cash is king. You need to fix collections.

Maybe it is easier said than done. But Pat Dickson at www.patdickson.com seems to have an answer. He says he fixes collections all the time by taking 3 easy steps. First, get the actual person responsible for paying you on the phone and get a commitment to pay, in writing. Second, if you aren't getting paid because you messed up, get a high level manager behind you and get the problem fixed. Finally, keep following up and threaten legal action if you must.

Comments: 8
Admin - Tue Mar 27, 2012 @ 04:09PM
Comments: 8

In today's world a lot of businesses are having a hard time making enough revenue to float, and things get worse when the revenue you do earn turns into delinquent accounts. In the end, if a business has enough cash, it is going to survive until the cash runs out. In fact, even a bad business with cash will live longer than a good business with no cash. The point, to cite the old cliche, is cash is king. So, if you are a contractor, subcontractor, or vendor, a contractor check to see if the person you are doing business with will be able to pay you is invaluable. Always make sure you check someone's credit status before you provide them with any labor or materials. At worst, try to get at least half your money down before you do anything, and if that fails, try to get paid the value of your materials once you can provide proof you have ordered them.

A contractor check can involve a bunch of things, like looking at financial statements, contacting the Better Business Bureau or chamber, the Registrar in your state, looking at litigation files, and even asking for references. Then once you've done your due diligence figuring out your risk in taking a job, you can negotiate terms that help offset the contractor's bad financial position. You can do things, like mentioned above, like demand money down, as much as all of it, depending on circumstances, ask for immediate payment for the value of any procured materials, or even put in your contract a provision saying you can stop work if you aren't paid the full balance of any past due amounts by the end of every month during the course of your project. Think of creative solutions and don't be shy. You have a lot of bargaining power if your Contractor has a cash crunch, needs you to perform work, and he knows you know he is in a bind.

Comments: 8
powered by Doodlekit™ Free Website Builder